Tag: South

South Korea’s internet giant Naver to join Sequoia, SoftBan…

South Korea’s internet giant Naver to join Sequoia, SoftBan…

Zoomd
Naver Corp, the operator of South Korea’s biggest search engine and internet portal, is mulling investing in funds operated by Sequoia Capital and Japan’s SoftBank Group as part of efforts to diversify its investment portfolio. According to a Korea Investors report, Naver’s board has decided to participate as a limited partner in Sequoia Capital’s Global Growth Fund III, a private equity fund that made the first close of $6 billion, with a hard cap of $8 billion. The South Korean Internet giant has also committed capital to a China fund co-managed by SoftBank and US private equity firm TPG. The report did not provide the exact amount of Naver’s funding commitment to the two new funds but a CNBC report in March said Sequoia Capital has set a $250-million minimum chec
Why googling squatter camps in South Africa returns picture…

Why googling squatter camps in South Africa returns picture…

Cludo
Google squatter camps and South Africa and images of impoverished white people are returned. The search has incensed and confused South Africans, who took to social media on June 14 to question this skewed representation of poverty in South Africa.   The search that is riling South Africans up. (Screengrab)With apartheid’s segregated past casting a long shadow over everyday life in contemporary South Africa, the Google search quickly took on a tone of racial inequality. The anger at Google though is misplaced since algorithms learn what humans teach them through their behavior. The search results are a reflection on a broader conversation on race and poverty. Please google "squatter camps in South Africa" and go to images. @Google when did this happen and why? 😳😳😳 — Xolisa Dyeshan
Why Google’s ‘squatter camps in South Africa’ search shows …

Why Google’s ‘squatter camps in South Africa’ search shows …

Google Site Search
Pretoria - Images of white people in informal settlements left hundreds of social media users confused after a popular advertising creative, Xolisa Dyashana, asked his Twitter followers to google ‘Squatter camps in South Africa’.A predominance of white adults and children in the images confused many social media users who asked themselves ‘Which South Africa is this?’.The tweet was eventually screen grabbed and shared on Facebook by users who probably expected to see more black people in the images.  Please google "squatter camps in South Africa" and go to images. @Google when did this happen and why? 😳😳😳 — Xolisa Dyeshana (@XolisaDyeshana) June 13, 2018 Despite the confusion, Dyeshana’s tweet also created an opportunity for social media users to educate themse