Tag: Amazon

Amazon knows what you buy, and it’s built a $125-billion do…

Amazon knows what you buy, and it’s built a $125-billion do…

Google Site Search
SEATTLE — When a chain of physical therapy centres wanted new patients, it aimed online ads at people near its offices who had bought knee braces recently on Amazon.When a financial services provider wanted to promote its retirement advisory business, it directed ads to people in their 40s and 50s who had recently ordered a personal finance book from Amazon.And when a major credit card company wanted new customers, it targeted people who used cards from other banks on the retail site. The advertisers found those people by using Amazon’s advertising services, which leverage what the company knows better than anyone: consumers’ online buying habits.“Amazon has a really straightforward database — they know what I buy,” said Daniel Knijnik, co-founder of Quartile Digital, an Amazon-focu
Amazon Extends Its Smart Home Lead Over Google With Keyless…

Amazon Extends Its Smart Home Lead Over Google With Keyless…

Algolia
 Last week I attended the annual CES conference in Las Vegas, NV, to learn about all the latest in consumer electronics. You can’t talk consumer electronics without talking about the smart home, and you can’t talk about the smart home without talking about Amazon and its pervasive Alexa voice assistant functionality, first-party devices, and licensed technology. For Amazon, its big splash at CES 2019 was mostly about making the smart home “keyless” and bringing more products and services into “Key By Amazon” fold.  Let’s take a look at what all the e-commerce giant announced, but first I want to talk strategy. Why “entry” matters Before I dive into the new products and services, I thought it was important to talk strategically why “entry” means so much to Amazon. This is more than a
Is Amazon creepier than Google at this point? – BGR

Is Amazon creepier than Google at this point? – BGR

AddSearch
Did someone distribute a privacy-related memo of some kind at Amazon recently — one that declares, at this point, there are no rules anymore? Because there have been a steady stream of reports out of the company for months now that make it seem like the internet retail giant is trying as hard as it possibly can to be even creepier than Google. The latest evidence came just this week, with news that the smart home company Ring which Amazon paid more than $1 billion to acquire has allegedly been violating its customers’ privacy in a shocking way — via its engineers and executives who reportedly have had “highly privileged access” to live customer camera feeds. That’s according to The Intercept, which quoted sources in recent days who also disclosed the existence of a Ring R&
CES 2019: Amazon and Google Assistant carve up tech expo

CES 2019: Amazon and Google Assistant carve up tech expo

Google Site Search
Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Alexa and Google Assistant aren't clamouring to be heard, they're clamouring to be spoken to At CES, there's no shortage of gadgets to talk to. Smart TVs, cars, pianos - and even a toilet - these are just some examples of devices that come with voice-activated helpers.No matter who makes the hardware, the virtual aide linked to or packaged inside is likely to be one of two: either Amazon's Alexa or Google Assistant.For ShadeCraft, the maker of a ne...
Everything we know so far about Williams-Sonoma v. Amazon

Everything we know so far about Williams-Sonoma v. Amazon

AddSearch
Last Friday, Williams-Sonoma took Amazon to court, claiming one of Amazon’s private label collections, Rivet, was selling nearly identical product to some popular West Elm furnishings. The suit also contains claims of dilution and unfair competition, reported Furniture Today: The suit, filed last Friday in U.S. District Court’s Northern California district, said an “unauthorized Williams-Sonoma branded store on (Amazon’s) website” that “falsely claims these retail services are ‘by Williams-Sonoma,’” which has led to misdirected consumer complaints to Williams-Sonoma that actually concern Amazon’s retail services. Williams-Sonoma’s action—Williams-Sonoma Inc. v. Amazon.com Inc., 18-cv-07548—also alleges that Amazon has infringed “upon a wide spectrum of WSI intellectual property r
Will You Save Amazon, Alexa?

Will You Save Amazon, Alexa?

Algolia
Amazon rainforestDepositphotos As far as we know, saving Amazonian forests does not constitute Jeff Bezos’ business strategy. Neither is it anywhere near Google’s corporate responsibility goals. There is, however, a company, whose whole business model is built around planting trees. To fulfill its goal, the company’s customers don’t need to do anything more than leisurely browse the web at their convenience. Just like Google, Ecosia is deriving its revenues from advertising, while up to 80 percent of its surplus income goes to tree planting nonprofit organizations, mainly in Brazil. In fact, a month ago, Ecosia announced its decision to channel all of its profits into tree planting activities, and changed the company’s status to a nonprofit. For those who are
Williams-Sonoma claims Amazon copies its West Elm furniture

Williams-Sonoma claims Amazon copies its West Elm furniture

AddSearch
Williams-Sonoma has sued Amazon.com in a case that challenges the online retailer’s private-label push that started with batteries, baby wipes and phone chargers and has expanded to include clothing, toys and high-end furniture. Amazon’s line of Rivet furniture includes products that are “strikingly similar” to those made by Williams-Sonoma’s West Elm unit, including a $300 orb chair the household goods maker introduced two years ago, according to the suit. “It is implausible Amazon could have conceived of a product line with nearly identical product designs” that feature
What I Learned By Quitting Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google,…

What I Learned By Quitting Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google,…

Google Site Search
In May I made the decision to excise the so-called “Big Five” tech companies from my life for a month. That meant no services offered by Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, Apple, or any of their subsidiaries. There were a number of reasons I wanted to undertake this experiment, ranging from reclaiming my privacy to learning more about how the technology I use every day actually works. The main reason, however, was simply to see if the Big Five services were actually necessary or merely convenient. I found that there were adequate open-source or independent replacements for pretty much every major Big Five service. In some cases, such as mapping software or social media platforms, the gulf between the Big Five and alternative services was so large that it made a noticeable, negative
Amazon, Flipkart beware! Google enters e-commerce, launches…

Amazon, Flipkart beware! Google enters e-commerce, launches…

Algolia
Amazon, Flipkart beware! Google enters e-commerce, launches new shopping search features for Indian users Tech giant Google Thursday unveiled ‘Google Shopping’ in India that will allow users to easily filter through offers, review prices from multiple retailers and find products that they are looking for. The personalised experience will be available across various Google products — a Shopping home page, Shopping tab on Google Search and through Google Lens. Customers will be able to see trending products across different categories, various deals, and compare prices using the new offering. READ ALSO | After Flipkart, Walmart eyes another Indian startup that specialises in AI For retailers, the company will offer its ‘Merchant Center’ in Hindi, which will allow the sellers to l
Tim Cook didn’t run a contest like Amazon for Apple’s new c…

Tim Cook didn’t run a contest like Amazon for Apple’s new c…

Google Site Search
Justin Sullivan | Getty Images Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple, speaks during an event at the Steve Jobs Theater at Apple Park on September 12, 2018 in Cupertino, California.  Apple CEO Tim Cook kept his promise in placing Apple's newest campuses — spanning several states and including a new $1 billion facility in Austin, Texas — and he didn't run a contest like Amazon's. Apple had been pointing to expansion efforts for several months, starting with a commitment announced in January to contribute $350 billion and 20,000 jobs to the U.S. economy over five years. But the company and its CEO were determined to keep competition and media