Photos of sick Iowa child used in social media ‘scam’ targe…


A local non-profit says it knows the identity of an alleged fraudster who used photos of a child from Iowa to launch a fake fundraising campaign targeting Campbell River residents on social media.

Someone going by the name of “Bob Dino” claimed to be raising money for the funeral expenses of a child named Dakota.

But the Cameryn’s Cause for Kids Society – a local group that provides financial assistance to families in crisis situations including the death of a child – said in a Jan. 4 statement that the user “is a fraud and is using a stolen photo of another child from the Internet.”

The user claimed that Cameryn’s Cause was supporting the campaign, but that statement was patently false, according to the non-profit society.

“We take fraud seriously and are disgusted that someone would attach our name to their scam,” the statement said. “We have a screening process that we follow for each applicant.”

In an update on Jan. 6, Cameryn’s Cause said the person behind the campaign is known to the group and to police, and that she goes by several names online.

“We cannot release her name but will say that she is a Campbell River resident who operates on social media under several aliases,” the statement said.

The Campbell River RCMP didn’t immediately reply to a request for comment on Monday, but Cameryn’s Cause said that it had provided information about the local resident to police.

Cameryn’s Cause said it also contacted police in Iowa, because the campaign also used photos of a now-deceased child from that state for the campaign. The group thanked members of the public for raising the issue and providing information “to let us know who this person is.”

By using Google’s reverse image search function, the Mirror has confirmed that the child is Garrett Matthias, a boy from Van Meter, Iowa, who died of cancer in July 2018.

Matthias’ case was widely reported by American media after his parents wrote a unique obituary based on the five-year-old child’s comments during his sickness, including “See ya later, suckas!” A GoFundMe set up to cover his medical expenses and other costs raised more than $71,000.

Compared to the original, the new and apparently fake campaign was a flop. GoFundMe told the Mirror in a Jan. 7 email that “no funds were raised and the campaign was removed by the campaign organizer.”

Caitlin Stanley, a spokesperson for GoFundMe, said that “campaigns with misuse” are “extremely rare and make up less than one-tenth of one per cent of all campaigns.”

The statement indicated that donors receive a refund “in the rare case that GoFundMe, law enforcement or a user finds campaigns are misused.”

Stanley said that donations to GoFundMe campaigns are “collected by our payment processors, held, and then released only to the person named as the beneficiary.”

She said that funds are only released “once we know who you are, who you’re raising the funds for, your relationship to the beneficiary (if there is one), how the funds are being spent, and how the funds are being delivered to the beneficiary (if there is one).”

Campbell River resident Sue Halstead says she and her husband shelled out $20 using a Facebook donation page (which has since been deleted) after seeing the appeal for funds on her husband’s news feed.

She sent an instant message to “Bob Dino,” asking whether the child was a twin, as indicated by a photo, and the Facebook user said yes.

Halstead told the user that GoFundMe might be more effective than Facebook for fundraising.

“The next thing I know, (the user) sends me back a GoFundMe page that’s been started,” she said.

The user then shared it on Campbell River Rant, Rave and Randomness, a popular Facebook forum (that post has also been deleted).

Halstead said she was relieved to know the story about the death of a local child wasn’t true when she saw the statement from Cameryn’s Cause.

But she was also appalled that someone would use real photos of a child dying of cancer to tug on people’s heartstrings.

“I was just disgusted that somebody would do that,” she said.

Correction: An earlier version of this story indicated that Sue Halstead and her husband donated $20 to the GoFundMe campaign. However, Halstead said in an email to the Mirror that she made the donation through a Facebook donation platform, not through GoFundMe. No money was raised through the GoFundMe campaign, according to company spokesperson Caitlin Stanley.

Zoomd Reports

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *