Film executives slam Google as they hail new government cra…


The Australian government are set to begin a crackdown on online piracy.

In a new proposed law being put forward in Parliament today, search engines such as Google will no longer be able to promote illegal downloading sites.

The tough law has been praised by Australian film industry executives, who label Google as ‘evil as Big Tobacco’.

In a new proposed law being put forward in Parliament today, search engines such as Google will no longer be able to promote illegal downloading sites, with film industry executives slamming the search engine 'as evil as Big Tobacco'

In a new proposed law being put forward in Parliament today, search engines such as Google will no longer be able to promote illegal downloading sites, with film industry executives slamming the search engine 'as evil as Big Tobacco'

In a new proposed law being put forward in Parliament today, search engines such as Google will no longer be able to promote illegal downloading sites, with film industry executives slamming the search engine ‘as evil as Big Tobacco’

Chief executive of Village Roadshow Graham Burke praised the proposal while slamming Google, saying the search engine giant are ‘facilitating and enabling crime’.

‘We see good Google and bad Google. But bad Google is as evil as Big Tobacco was 30 years ago. They know what they’re doing. They know they’re facilitating and enabling crime and it’s time for them to clean their act up,’ he told The Courier Mail.

Citing Mad Max: Fury Road as an example, he said that if you type ‘Mad Max fury Road Download Free’, Google will redirect you to an illegal site. 

Chief executive of Village Roadshow Graham Burk said that if you typed  Mad Max: Fury Road into Google the search engine will take you to a site where users can illegally download the movie (Tom Hardy pictured in Mad Max: Fury Road)

Chief executive of Village Roadshow Graham Burk said that if you typed  Mad Max: Fury Road into Google the search engine will take you to a site where users can illegally download the movie (Tom Hardy pictured in Mad Max: Fury Road)

Chief executive of Village Roadshow Graham Burk said that if you typed Mad Max: Fury Road into Google the search engine will take you to a site where users can illegally download the movie (Tom Hardy pictured in Mad Max: Fury Road)

He said that that the new legislation will give the industry some defence against illegal downloading. 

Communications Minister Mitch Fifield said he’s ready to combat piracy as he pushes to broaden the current laws introduced in 2015.

Current laws allow copyright owners to seek a Federal Court order to block pirate websites. 

 The proposed legislation will allow filmmakers, singers and other artists to seek a court order to force Google or other search engines to block or delete results for pirate sites.  

‘Online piracy is theft. Downloading or streaming a pirated movie or TV show is no different to stealing a DVD from a shop,’ Minister Fifield said.   

Daily Mail Australia contacted Google around the new law and Burke’s comments, with a spokesperson saying: ‘Google takes the fight against online piracy very seriously’.

‘We have invested tens of millions of dollars in tools and systems that help fight online piracy, including on Search. We downrank sites in Search that have a large number of valid DMCA notices and ban pirate sites from our ad network.’ 

Communications Minister Mitch Fifield said he's ready to combat piracy for good as he pushes to broaden the already introduced laws from 2015

Communications Minister Mitch Fifield said he's ready to combat piracy for good as he pushes to broaden the already introduced laws from 2015

Communications Minister Mitch Fifield said he’s ready to combat piracy for good as he pushes to broaden the already introduced laws from 2015

Zoomd Trends

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *